Normand Hudon… from A to Z : extended until March 16th.

2008-02-29, from Member
Sherbrooke, February 25th, 2008 -The Sherbrooke, February 25th, 2008: The Musée des beaux-arts de Sherbrooke is pleased to announce that, du to public demand and a good attendance, the presentation of the exhibition Normand Hudon, from A to Z is extended until Sunday March 16th, 2008. The Musée des beaux-arts de Sherbrooke, 241 Dufferin Street, is open Tuesday to Sunday, from noon to 5 p.m. Entrance fees : $7,50, adult, $6, senior, $5, student. Guided tours in French every Tuesday at 2 p.m. English tours and group tours available anytime upon reservation. The Musée is supported by the Ministère de la Culture, des Communications et de la Condition féminine du Quéabec and Ville de Sherbrooke.

The exhibition: Guest curator Michel Forest has worked closely with the artist’s widow, Madame Arlette Hudon, to distinguish four aspects of Normand Hudon’s work they judge to be essential and representative: his mastery of drawing, the depth of his critical understanding and richness of his message, his sense of humour, and the tenderness he felt for the Québec of his youth. Through these themes the personality of Normand Hudon is revealed – the accomplished artist, the natural thespian, the clever intellectual, the sympathetic comic, and the critical observer who also feels nostalgia for the life and people of his time. Michel Forest explains his choices for staging the exhibition: ‘To pay him homage, we have chosen to borrow from Hudon the concept of one of his last and unfinished projects, a dictionary of favourite thoughts and drawings entitled “Le petit Hudon illustré”. Using his alphabetic formula, we try to illuminate his many talents, his main visual themes and favourite targets, as well as some novel Hudonesque “pearls”. In this we have been greatly aided by Madame Arlette Hudon, the painter’s wife, whom we thank along with the institutions and generous lenders who have made the exhibition possible.’

Biographical Notes: Born in Montréal in 1929, Normand Hudon sold his first pieces to the newspaper La Presse in 1945. Two years later, he enrolled in the École des beaux-arts de Montréal, where he passed the next three years. During this time, he published his first caricatures in La Patrie and the Petit Journal, illustrated articles by Jacques Hébert in La Patrie, and published two comic strips in the supplement to Petit Journal. At the same period, he began to exhibit his own artwork in Montréal. In September 1951, Normand Hudon left Québec to travel in Europe. There he spent some time at the Académie Montmartre in Paris, as well as many days studying the grand masters in the Louvre. Returning to Québec in 1952, Hudon again began his work as caricaturist and illustrator for several newspapers. In a new departure, he took to the stage in a cabaret show which combined humour and drawing. The same year he made his television début, and quickly became a star of the Montréal artistic scene. He continued as an illustrator for the works of many Québécois authors, and produced a number of posters, all the while continuing to show his paintings in the galleries of Montréal. In 1954, he published the first of four collections of his caricatures. Then, in 1958, he became Robert Lapalme’s successor as official caricaturist for the newspaper Le Devoir. He moved to a similar position at La Presse in 1961 and remained there until 1963. Beginning in the mid 1960s, Normand Hudon began to leave the footlights behind and re-orient his career. He explored a number of new avenues, but fixed eventually on painting which remained his principal occupation for the rest of his life. He died in Montreal in January 1997, after residing many years in Hatley, in the Eastern Townships.
is pleased to announce that, du to public demand and a good attendance, the presentation of the exhibition Normand Hudon, from A to Z is extended until Sunday March 16th, 2008. The Musée des beaux-arts de Sherbrooke, 241 Dufferin Street, is open Tuesday to Sunday, from noon to 5 p.m. Entrance fees : $7,50, adult, $6, senior, $5, student. Guided tours in French every Tuesday at 2 p.m. English tours and group tours available anytime upon reservation. The Musée is supported by the Ministère de la Culture, des Communications et de la Condition féminine du Quéabec and Ville de Sherbrooke.

The exhibition: Guest curator Michel Forest has worked closely with the artist’s widow, Madame Arlette Hudon, to distinguish four aspects of Normand Hudon’s work they judge to be essential and representative: his mastery of drawing, the depth of his critical understanding and richness of his message, his sense of humour, and the tenderness he felt for the Québec of his youth. Through these themes the personality of Normand Hudon is revealed – the accomplished artist, the natural thespian, the clever intellectual, the sympathetic comic, and the critical observer who also feels nostalgia for the life and people of his time. Michel Forest explains his choices for staging the exhibition: ‘To pay him homage, we have chosen to borrow from Hudon the concept of one of his last and unfinished projects, a dictionary of favourite thoughts and drawings entitled “Le petit Hudon illustré”. Using his alphabetic formula, we try to illuminate his many talents, his main visual themes and favourite targets, as well as some novel Hudonesque “pearls”. In this we have been greatly aided by Madame Arlette Hudon, the painter’s wife, whom we thank along with the institutions and generous lenders who have made the exhibition possible.’

Biographical Notes: Born in Montréal in 1929, Normand Hudon sold his first pieces to the newspaper La Presse in 1945. Two years later, he enrolled in the École des beaux-arts de Montréal, where he passed the next three years. During this time, he published his first caricatures in La Patrie and the Petit Journal, illustrated articles by Jacques Hébert in La Patrie, and published two comic strips in the supplement to Petit Journal. At the same period, he began to exhibit his own artwork in Montréal. In September 1951, Normand Hudon left Québec to travel in Europe. There he spent some time at the Académie Montmartre in Paris, as well as many days studying the grand masters in the Louvre. Returning to Québec in 1952, Hudon again began his work as caricaturist and illustrator for several newspapers. In a new departure, he took to the stage in a cabaret show which combined humour and drawing. The same year he made his television début, and quickly became a star of the Montréal artistic scene. He continued as an illustrator for the works of many Québécois authors, and produced a number of posters, all the while continuing to show his paintings in the galleries of Montréal. In 1954, he published the first of four collections of his caricatures. Then, in 1958, he became Robert Lapalme’s successor as official caricaturist for the newspaper Le Devoir. He moved to a similar position at La Presse in 1961 and remained there until 1963. Beginning in the mid 1960s, Normand Hudon began to leave the footlights behind and re-orient his career. He explored a number of new avenues, but fixed eventually on painting which remained his principal occupation for the rest of his life. He died in Montreal in January 1997, after residing many years in Hatley, in the Eastern Townships. 
 The Musée des beaux-arts de Sherbrooke is pleased to announce that, du to public demand and a good attendance, the presentation of the exhibition Normand Hudon, from A to Z is extended until Sunday March 16th, 2008. The Musée des beaux-arts de Sherbrooke, 241 Dufferin Street, is open Tuesday to Sunday, from noon to 5 p.m. Entrance fees : $7,50, adult, $6, senior, $5, student. Guided tours in French every Tuesday at 2 p.m. English tours and group tours available anytime upon reservation. The Musée is supported by the Ministère de la Culture, des Communications et de la Condition féminine du Quéabec and Ville de Sherbrooke.

The exhibition: Guest curator Michel Forest has worked closely with the artist’s widow, Madame Arlette Hudon, to distinguish four aspects of Normand Hudon’s work they judge to be essential and representative: his mastery of drawing, the depth of his critical understanding and richness of his message, his sense of humour, and the tenderness he felt for the Québec of his youth. Through these themes the personality of Normand Hudon is revealed – the accomplished artist, the natural thespian, the clever intellectual, the sympathetic comic, and the critical observer who also feels nostalgia for the life and people of his time. Michel Forest explains his choices for staging the exhibition: ‘To pay him homage, we have chosen to borrow from Hudon the concept of one of his last and unfinished projects, a dictionary of favourite thoughts and drawings entitled “Le petit Hudon illustré”. Using his alphabetic formula, we try to illuminate his many talents, his main visual themes and favourite targets, as well as some novel Hudonesque “pearls”. In this we have been greatly aided by Madame Arlette Hudon, the painter’s wife, whom we thank along with the institutions and generous lenders who have made the exhibition possible.’

Biographical Notes: Born in Montréal in 1929, Normand Hudon sold his first pieces to the newspaper La Presse in 1945. Two years later, he enrolled in the École des beaux-arts de Montréal, where he passed the next three years. During this time, he published his first caricatures in La Patrie and the Petit Journal, illustrated articles by Jacques Hébert in La Patrie, and published two comic strips in the supplement to Petit Journal. At the same period, he began to exhibit his own artwork in Montréal. In September 1951, Normand Hudon left Québec to travel in Europe. There he spent some time at the Académie Montmartre in Paris, as well as many days studying the grand masters in the Louvre. Returning to Québec in 1952, Hudon again began his work as caricaturist and illustrator for several newspapers. In a new departure, he took to the stage in a cabaret show which combined humour and drawing. The same year he made his television début, and quickly became a star of the Montréal artistic scene. He continued as an illustrator for the works of many Québécois authors, and produced a number of posters, all the while continuing to show his paintings in the galleries of Montréal. In 1954, he published the first of four collections of his caricatures. Then, in 1958, he became Robert Lapalme’s successor as official caricaturist for the newspaper Le Devoir. He moved to a similar position at La Presse in 1961 and remained there until 1963. Beginning in the mid 1960s, Normand Hudon began to leave the footlights behind and re-orient his career. He explored a number of new avenues, but fixed eventually on painting which remained his principal occupation for the rest of his life. He died in Montreal in January 1997, after residing many years in Hatley, in the Eastern Townships.

Source:
Lise Boyer
Tel: 819 821-2115
mbas@interlinx.qc.ca

 
 

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